The One Breasted Warrior

One breasted warriorI’m still fighting. It hurts physically and emotionally. I am not getting any closer to complete healing or a body that has all of it’s parts in place. I remain hopeful though, hopeful that the cancer does not return. My foolish, vain self marched into the plastic surgeon’s office recently and  boldly stated that I would like to discuss my options for making another run at reconstruction. I haven’t  stopped worrying or crying since that bold move.

“We need to find the root cause of the chronic pain in your chest.” stated the surgeon. “It is most likely necrosis of the bone from radiation. I can order an MRI and we can see what is going on in there. If it’s nothing than we can start with a scar revision, then blah, blah, blah…” He continued.

MRI? That picks up cancer too I thought. Is he looking for cancer? Why do these doctors want to continuously look for cancer in my body?

I had two MRI’s done the following week on two separate days, double the stress. One was to check the left breast that still remains with it’s small but perfectly proportioned implant. The other MRI was to look at my right chest and ribs where nothing remains but skin tact down onto my bones and pain that never stops. Wearing a bra and a prosthesis is an act of a warrior. It is like my shield as I go out into the world trying to fit in with the normal breasted women. It is incredibly painful to wear this shield as it hits right where all of the pain is concentrated. I  dig for a warriors courage just to get dressed for work in the morning. By the end of the day that bra must come off immediately and I greet my son and his friends with one breast. Most are too polite to stare, but they all hug me sideways, as if they are afraid to hurt me or confirm what they see through touch.

The MRI’s came back inconclusive. “There is something on your ribs but we are not sure if it is injury or metastatic bone cancer.” Said the surgeon. “I am going to have the Tumor Board review your case and make a recommendation. Don’t worry, it’s probably nothing.”

How many times have I heard that? “Don’t worry, it’s probably nothing.” News flash to my team of doctors, it has always been something when you go poking around looking for cancer in me. I cringe when I hear those words.

The “Board” recommended a PET scan. Where in the fuck is my warrior Xanax?!

The last time I had a PET scan was right before I started chemo therapy a couple of years ago. This time, I merely went to the plastic surgeon and inquired about reconstruction and now I am having a contrast dye put into an IV that is hanging out of my arm. The tears rolled freely down my face as I was positioned into the machine. “Are you okay?” Asked the tall, dark, handsome technician as he handed me a tissue and waited patiently for me to stop crying so he could start the test. I dug deep for my warrior strength and fell still and quiet while the machine hummed around me searching for cells that are ruining my life and trying to kill me.

The results were sent to the Tumor Board and they recommended a biopsy of my ribs.

I called my oncologist and pretty much said what the fuck?! “I don’t think there is anything to be worried about,” he said. I couldn’t breath. I walked outside of the hospital where I was at work to continue the conversation but my legs were starting to go numb from panic.

“Let me have another radiologist take a look at the films.” He offered. “I will be in touch, don’t worry Trina.”

One breasted warrior 1

It’s Not All About The Pink Bras…Meet Claudia

Meet Claudia

I met Claudia through this blog. I want to thank her for allowing me to share this letter that she wrote to her gynecologist after her doctor missed obvious signs of breast cancer. Claudia is incredibly strong and brave for sharing these pictures of herself in the hope of saving another woman from going through a similar experience. Thank you Claudia for your friendship and for your generosity.

Dear Doctor,

It has been one year since I was diagnosed with Stage 3A breast cancer. I had a tumor measuring 9 centimeters. Ductal and lobular carcinoma, invasive, advanced disease, as you must surely know as a physician. Since then, I have endured a very sad and hard path in my life.

I lost my breasts, lost both of my nipples, lost my hair, and I can’t have estrogen circulating in my body.  As a gynecologist, you know what that does to me physically, and emotionally.

What does breast cancer treatments look like

Claudia sent this picture of herself with this letter to her gynecologist. Her doctor never responded.

I’m not sure if you forgot about it or not but I wanted to remind you of our last conversation.

You were my first line of defense against breast cancer. Here are the facts: one out of eight women will get some kind of breast cancer. Women who have fibrocystic or dense breast tissue have a higher chance of being diagnosed with it. Also, lobular cancer is very hard to detect. Knowing these three things should have made you think twice after reading my last mammogram report and after you personally examined me with your experienced hands.

I had a fat pocket that grew under my armpit and the only reason it grew there was because the tumor had pushed it out. I found out too late because you did nothing about it when I brought it to your attention.

My left nipple was leaking and turning inward, your words were, “It must be because you jog, because of the rubbing on your nipples, your brain thinks you are lactating.”

Burns from radiation treatment

Burns from Radiation Treatment

Well, my nipple was leaking because I had breast cancer. My nipple turned inward because I had breast cancer and that mass under my armpit was due to breast cancer.

You have two girls. Can you imagine if this happened to one of them or to you for that matter? Can you imagine losing your hair, losing your breasts?  How about watching your mom, dad, husband, young kids, and friends see you go through this suffering and not able to do anything about it?

Tamoxifen may save my life but let me tell you something, it numbs me. The side effects take away my quality of life.

I am grieving right now. I don’t know if I will live for two or twenty years. How do you think I feel having to do tests every three months, PET scans every six months and then every day of my life hanging onto the thought that at any time cancer could come back?

Although this is not a blame game, many times my thoughts go to you. I do blame you for your lack of care and attention. Be happy that I am not reaching you through lawyers.

After the mastectomy before reconstruction.

After the mastectomy, before reconstruction.

Pay more attention to your patients, teach them what to look for, educate them on breast cancer, or any other cancer related to your specialty. You made an oath as a doctor, have you forgotten what that really means?

Maybe I couldn’t have avoided the cancer. But you could have helped me avoid it being detected at stage 3.

Claudia Degomme, your ex-patient.

Degomme Family

The Degomme Family

Note: Claudia was smart, she followed her intuition and sought a second opinion when her doctor told her that her symptoms were nothing to worry about. Her best friend who is also a doctor provided the answers she needed to save her life. Here in Claudia’s words are what happened next.

Anaisys came with her family to dinner on a Saturday. Something was telling me that there was something wrong with my left breast because my nipple started to leak a little and it was going inward, even though the mammogram had come back CLEAR. 
I asked Anaisys to take a look and she noticed a dimpling in my breast’s skin and she said that was typical of a tumor. She did not say much more, I guess not to scare me, but she told me afterwards that she feared I had a tumor. So she herself made the call to the breast surgeon and made an appointment for me. Monday I was at the doctor’s office at 9 a.m. with my husband, not knowing that soon I was going to go through the hardest, saddest, craziest ride of my life. 
 Claudia and Anaisys

Claudia and her supportive, loving husband Yvan.

Claudia and her supportive, loving husband Yvan.

Prosthetic Breast, Seriously?!

prosthetic breast 1

Part one of my sagas.

The word prosthetic to me sounds old, broken, missing, braced, fake or injured. It gets stuck on my tongue and I don’t like it. I don’t like the way the word sounds, and I don’t like saying it. What is it supposed to mean anyway, a good aesthetic? Does that mean without a prosthesis, I don’t look good, that I am unpleasing to the eye? Crap that is a lot to digest since I have endured 16+ surgeries trying to look “normal.” Still after all of those surgeries, my body rejected the implant, twice.
prosthetic breast

I don’t want a prosthetic breast, although my mom points out that an implant is a prosthesis. Technically she is correct, but for this article I am referring to an external device. I don’t want one because I don’t intend to remain in my current physically unpleasing to the eye state of being. I plan to be fully reconstructed and I have a wonderful and talented plastic surgeon who agrees with that plan. However, in the short-term, until my body can fully heal from the complications of so many surgeries and radiation treatments, I have a missing accessory. One would not be able to stop themselves from staring at my single perfectly augmented breast compared to the empty, hollowness on my right side. I have come up with a temporary solution; gauze (still healing) and cup type inserts that are removable from my bikinis. These breast shaped pads work great, but they sometimes become dislodged from the shelf-bra camisoles that I wear; I’m still too sore for a regular bra. When they become lose they land somewhere in my armpit or in the center of my chest, which is definitely not pro-aesthetic!

After I finished breast-feeding Curtis, my B cup breasts shrank to AA (which really means negative A in the bra sizing world. Why does a DD mean larger than D, but AA mean smaller than A?). I was spending a lot of time on our boat and in bathing suits, and I didn’t want to go out and buy all new smaller cupped bikinis, so I purchased the chicken cutlet looking breast inserts that some women wear to enhance their cup size. They are made of a silicone type gel and they are pretty heavy in weight. They worked fine to fill up my bathing suit tops, until the day I left them in while water skiing. I took a nasty spill that day, and those cutlets flew out of my top and were floating on top of the lake. My friends in the boat had a good hysterical fit of laughter as they were pointing to the fake boobies bobbing up and down in the water while I tried to swim after them to retrieve them. I laughed too, I don’t know why I thought those things would stay in place, and I was slightly embarrassed that my secrets were out and floating on top of the wake for all to see. I hated wearing the cutlets, they were hot and sweaty and obviously prone to fall out because of my active lifestyle. I immediately went out and bought all new bathing suits and sold the cutlets at a garage sale, those suckers were expensive, so I knew someone would buy them. I learned to embrace my small breasts, dress accordingly, and never ever considered augmentation until I was faced with reconstruction post-mastectomy. I quickly warmed up to the idea of insurance paid implants; I think they are the silver lining common denominator for breast cancer survivors or those having a prophylactic mastectomy.

So now I am planning an annual family trip to Puerto Vallarta, and I am wondering how I am going to navigate resort wear with only one breast. I decided it was time to go for a prosthetic fitting. Fitting, the word should be used to describe Kim Kardashian with a flock of stylists pinning her outfits on her in a way that shows off her spectacular curves. That’s the kind of fitting I want, not one for a fake external boob.

prosthetic breast 6

When I lost my hair from chemo, I would only wear wigs if I were going out in public. I wore them mainly to make other people feel comfortable around me. I didn’t want my cancer to be the center of attention and by wearing a wig I could blend in. People around me were more comfortable without ever even knowing that I was making them feel more comfortable. I on the other hand was not physically comfortable; wigs are hot, sweaty, and itchy, just like the cutlets. So mainly I would wear a baseball cap or a beanie type hat more often than wearing wigs for jaunts to the doctors for treatments or to the store or gym. I was able to continue to work out at the gym during my off weeks of chemo and would just throw on a baseball cap. I drew a lot of stares, but eventually people got used to seeing me at the gym with my bald head under a baseball cap, or I simply got used to the stares. However, I’m not prepared for people staring at my chest and trying to put together the pieces of my life in their minds, especially in a bathing suit.
prosthetic breast 4

I called the local cancer resource center and asked them if there was a place in town that sold breast prosthesis. The center gave me three names: a prosthetic business, a pharmacy, and a lingerie store. I called the prosthetic company versus the lingerie store, I already knew what the lingerie store sold; cutlets. I couldn’t imagine that a pharmacy would be a good place to try on fake boobs for size so I didn’t even write that phone number down. The lady who picked up the phone was kind and told me that my insurance would pay for the visit and for the prosthetic, good news, so I set up an appointment for the following Tuesday.

“It’s no big deal,” said my mom who wears a prosthesis after her own mastectomy decades before. She had widespread early stage breast cancer, had a unilateral mastectomy and reconstruction, and fortunately her breast cancer has not returned like mine did. “See look at mine,” she said as she pulled it out of her bra and waved it at me. I laughed as I dodged it. She uses a prosthetic to create symmetry; reconstructive surgeries are far more sophisticated now than they were 25+ years ago. My mom is obviously comfortable with not only saying the word, but showing me the device. “It’s quite comfortable and look here at this area, it absorbs the sweat,” she was saying and pointing. I looked more out of the corner of my eye than dead onto it, I didn’t want to interact too much with my mom’s prosthetic breast. I didn’t want to face my own need.

prosthetic breast 2

We had a good laugh at the whole thing; sitting outside on the deck drinking Chardonnay with the sun on our chests as we shared our battle scars with each other. Anyone could have driven by and seen us, but we didn’t care because we were not alone in our suffering and we could laugh at our circumstance.

Next week,part two, after the fitting, which by the way seems like a very formal process. NOT looking forward to it. Not at all…

prosthetic breast 3 prosthetic breast 5

A Botched Boob-Job

 

If you Google botched boob jobs, the pictures you see here will come up; grotesquely undesirable breasts complete with commentary. I had a botched boob job, but mine was far different than those of these women.

During a unilateral mastectomy (one boob) a couple of years ago, I had immediate reconstructive surgery. The breast health surgeon was there as well as the plastic surgeon. One giveth, one taketh away. It has been complicated because I had already had one course of radiation on that breast and radiation degrades the tissues and its ability to maintain a foreign object. It all went well and after multiple surgeries, I had two perfectly natural looking augmented breasts. I was impressed.

Then the cancer came back for a third time. The doctors told me I would have to have the implant taken out and a tissue expander put back in for the better part of a year while I underwent chemo and another course of radiation. I was devastated at this news. The tissue expander is by far one of the most painful aspects of this whole journey. I know I have complained about it before, but I just can’t complain enough about this torturous device. There has got to be a better way to “hold the space” for an implant without putting a hard squeaky toy in a woman’s chest wall. I spoke endlessly with my surgeons about this, even negotiated a way to live with the tissue expander for a shorter amount of time than what they originally wanted. However, I may need to become an advocate for a new type of technology, or hire a team of engineers to come up with something different on my own, because what is available is ridiculously painful.

I got through the nine months or so with the tissue expander and now it was time to remove it and replace it with a nice soft pliable silicone implant. I was never happier to undergo a surgery. But after surgery, things started to go downhill. My body was not healing. The radiation oncologist warned me that all of the radiation that I have had could cause the body to reject an implant all together. The tissue is no longer healthy, which is what they wanted in order to keep the cancer from returning. But without healthy tissue, there is no healing.

4 weeks post-surgery the incision opened up and a flood of fluid pooled around me. I was completely freaked out as I could tell that my body was “rejecting” the implant. The radiation oncologist suggested that I just remove the implant altogether and have only one breast…I looked him square in the eyes and asked him how many body parts he was living without because of cancer. He looked away. I called the plastic surgeon. 

“We need to get you in tomorrow for emergency surgery” said the surgeon. “I want to swap out the implant which has probably become infected, move the incision in order to find healthy skin that will heal and put a drain in so there is no pressure on the incision as this will take a long time to heal.”

“Fine,” I said. “We need to save her; I’m not ready for a uniboob.”

So back to surgery I went, I think this was the 15th on this same little breast, but I wasn’t giving up.

Since I was their last case of the day, I couldn’t eat or drink anything and I had to wait around all day while they squeezed me in for this emergency procedure. It was starting to get dark outside and the staff was starting to leave the surgery center for the day. Finally it was my turn. They wheeled me into the OR and I looked at the clock, it was 4:30 pm. The anesthesiologist came in and mixed up a nice cocktail for me that he put into the IV. He asked me a question, but I don’t remember answering it, man I love that stuff!

A couple of hours later I was in recovery and Joe was back by my side. We drove home and I settled in to begin the long road to healing. It has been 10 days since the surgery, I still have the drain, but the surgeon is seeing good signs of healing. I told the universe that I am coming out of this thing with two breasts and no cancer. I will settle for nothing less and I won’t give up on being healthy and whole.

But the question that still lingers on my lips is why oh why do woman have grotesquely weird augmentations done to themselves? 

Thanksgiving: An American Tradition of Gratitude

 On the 4th Thursday of every November Americans gather with their friends and families to give thanks, and to indulge on turkey, mashed potatoes, and stuffing. Here a list of of things that I am thankful for this year, I encourage you to come up with your own list.

Vatican City, Rome

  • After completing chemo therapy in December, Joe and I took a celebratory trip to Italy in January. I was sick, bald, and nowhere close to recovered from the poisons my body endured, but my will was strong and I refused to wait another day to get on with my life. We visited; Rome, Florence, Perugia, Bologna, and Venice. It was magical and I loved every minute of it.
  • I am most thankful for all of the love and support that I have received from my friends and family this year. I sit in awe of the kindness that people have shown to me, everything from messages on-line, phone calls, cards, flowers, meals, visits, prayers, vitamins, rides to treatment, fund-raisers for cancer research and treatment, books, or a shoulder to cry on, my friends and family really stepped up and were there for me. I truly could not have made it through this year without this love and support, and I am humbled by it.

    Dirty Girls of Del Norte

    Trina and Reina after the ACS walk

  • I am grateful for Joe. Joe co-founded Jamba Juice, he carved out a hugely successful career for himself and when he was able to retire at age 40, he took on the monumental task of taking care of me, our (collective) three kids and our household while I battled cancer. He works tirelessly and never ever complains, instead, I hear him singing while he works. He has done an amazing job keeping it all together for us, and he does so in a loving way; I have learned a lot from him.
  • I absolutely love the maturity that my 16-year-old son Curtis demonstrated this year. Watching him blossom into a young man is such a joy  for me. He is my only child, and my illness has been incredibly hard on him. We have grown even closer over this past year and I treasure the intimate bond that I share with him. He inspires me to keep fighting every day.

    Curtis Junior Year

  • I am beyond grateful that I am cancer free today. After three breast cancer diagnosis, chemo, 2 rounds of radiation and 15 surgeries, I will always remain cautiously optimistic that the cancer won’t return, however, it is something I live with every day. What I have learned is that recurrent cancer is a host problem, meaning my body lacks the ability to effectively trap and eliminate carcinogens. I have spent this past year learning how I can support my immune system so that I may have a better chance of the cancer not returning again. Admittedly I became a little obsessed with reading the obituaries and when I saw a woman’s obit talking about how “she bravely fought cancer for x years but finally succumbed” I get very scared. Will this too be my fate? I am grateful it wasn’t my fate in 2012!
  • You know I have to mention my dog Dash, I will always be grateful for her sweet disposition and presence in my life. What a blessing this creature is to me.

    Dash

  • I am grateful that I got to see my dear friend Smith’s daughter Natalie get married. Being able to share this event with them fueled my body, and nourished my soul. Life is short, RSVP yes! to everything you can.

    RSVP – YES to everything!

  • I am grateful that I found the courage to write my story. My one book has turned into three and though not published yet, they soon will be! I have received feedback from people around the world that my story has touched; I am honored to be able to share it. I began writing because I was afraid that I would die of cancer before my son truly knew who his mom, the woman, the person was. He is not ready to read my story yet, but I am grateful that I did this for him and for me.
  • I am grateful for the lessons that I have learned this year; facing my own mortality has taught me so much about living.

    Joe’s garden nourishing my body

  • Yoga and meditation. They have changed my life and the way I handle stress. I recommend it to everyone. If you would like to take a look at meditation, Deepak Chopra is currently offering a free 21-day meditation challenge on the law of abundance. These are 15 minute guided meditation sessions that you can access by going to Oprah.com/Chopra.
  • I am grateful for my son’s tutor Sarah. She has become invaluable as he struggles to pass algebra. Today was his final; fingers crossed!
  • Our new kitchen appliances; cooking for three teenage boys is much more enjoyable with a nice range.
  • I am thankful for the continued benefits that I receive from a company that I have not been able to contribute to for over a year. I do not take for granted that they pay for my health insurance and that I still have an income because of their generous benefit program.
  • I am happy that my hair grew back. Bald is hard to pull off and wigs are hot and itchy!

    Venice, Italy

  • I am happy to have the tissue expander out of my body. I had a hard plastic “squeaky toy” in my chest wall for most of the year, and now it has been replaced by a soft implant. Unfortunately all of the radiation that I have had is slowing the healing time way down, but I have two gorgeous breasts and for that, I am grateful.
  • I am grateful for Oprah. The quality of the content that she airs literally saved my soul and I spent countless hours learning from her and her guests this past year.
  • I love the Mercedes I bought this year. I never talk about material possessions, because I really don’t care about them, but I really appreciate the quality of this car and the way it looks.
  • And lastly, I am grateful to YOU for reading all of this; YOU are touching my life one way or the other just by reading this, thank you.

    Indoor skydiving Curtis, James, Trina, Joe and Johnny

Radiation Therapy and a Dog Named Dash

Dash and I out for a walk

On the first day of radiation, the friendly medical assistant showed me into the dressing room, handed me a patient gown and a key to a locker dangling from a twisted piece of plastic in the shape of a bracelet. She showed me to a cupboard where there was a drawer labeled with my name on it. Seeing my name there in print amongst the names of the other patients made my heart sink. I wondered who these people were and what kind of cancer they had.

“Each day when you are done with your treatment, you can store your gown here to use again,” said the medical assistant. Then she escorted me to a chair to wait my turn for the blast of radiation coming from the huge machine inside the sterile room that the technicians fled from before hitting the kill button. There is no comfort in seeing the person who is administering your treatment for cancer protecting themselves from the same toxins. It makes you pause in wonderment and fear and made me want to flee with her.

The patient before me left the room and now it was my turn. My eyes darted from side to side and I broke out into a sweat as I was positioned on the table. While holding my arms overhead and tilting my chin away from my chest as I was instructed to do so, tears ran down my cheeks. I felt sad, scared and physically exposed with my breast out in the open. The machine began moving around me and made a low humming noise. A red light glowed in the corner of the room, sort of like a traffic light, warning the staff not to come in. A few moments later the machine stopped back in its original position. The technician came in and told me I could release my arms. “All done Trina,” she said. “See you tomorrow.”

This routine went on every day, and I continued to work around my treatment appointments. A few weeks into radiation, I became very fatigued. I had trouble doing the smallest of tasks and spent most of the evenings in bed after work. I would get up only long enough to try to gather up some dinner for my son. I decided I needed to take a short-term leave of absence from work so I could rest in between treatments. I just couldn’t do it all and I had a hard time admitting that to myself.

The weeks that followed were filled with daily trips to and from the clinic and lonely hours in bed. I decided I needed a full-time companion to keep me company and a dog was just the ticket. I was thumbing through a magazine when I saw an advertisement that featured a Dachshund. I fell in love with the adorable little creature in the pictures and tore out the page to show my son Curtis. “This is the kind of dog I want,” I told him. He just shook his head. If it wasn’t a big dog like the Golden Retriever his dad has, he couldn’t see the point.

On Saturday Curtis and his friend wanted to hang out at the pier in Pismo Beach and asked if I could drive them there. I thought it would be a good opportunity to walk the beach and clear my head while they hung out so I agreed. As I was coming up the beach Curtis was yelling to me from the top of the pier. “I found our dog Mom, come quick,” he shouted. He excitedly lead me to the local pet store just off the main drag, all the way I protested that there was no way I was buying a dog today. Behind the glass barrier was a red miniature Wiener dog with the most precious face I had ever seen. The clerk brought the puppy out and handed her to me. She immediately wrapped her head and neck around mine and snuggled up to my chest. She clung there in desperation as if she was willing me to take her home. I was instantly hooked. There was no way I was leaving this store without her. I bought all the puppy supplies that the clerk recommended and a $1000 later, I walked out with the newest member of our family. I named her Dash. I thought it was a fun play on words for the breed and her long body reminded me of a dash mark. That first night at home I placed Dash on the floor at the foot of my bed in the kennel that the clerk said I would need in order to train her. She whined a little and seemed scared and restless. I kept popping up from my pillow to look at her every time she moved in the night. Neither of us got a good night sleep. The next night I decided she would sleep on the bed with me. She was so small and timid and I wanted to protect her from falling off of the bed so I built a wall of pillows around her to encapsulate her. She still wasn’t settled with this arrangement. On the third night Joe was there with us. She curled up onto Joe’s chest and rested her head into his neck. She stayed like that all night and it was love at first sight for those two. From then on Dash would snuggle with us throughout the night. She burrows under the covers to keep warm, and her body next to mine is like a hot water bottle. Her calm loving spirit coupled with her timid personality made her the perfect companion for me while I was resting in bed. During the day we would take long walks together and then rush back to the comfort of our bed exhausted from the outing. This sweet little creature became one of the greatest loves of my life, and my emotional savior.

Of Course They’re Fake, The Real Ones Tried To Kill Me

October 2011

Breasts, tits, hooters, ta-tas, knockers, melons, jugs, boobs, bosoms, headlights, chest puppies, cans, the girls, rack, bazookas, or whatever you call them, they are a powerful part of the female body. Our breasts can attract mates, nourish babies, provide self-esteem, contribute to a woman’s sexual well-being and be the constant subject of male fascination everywhere. But for some of us, they are trying to kill us.

After my second diagnosis with breast cancer, my doctors informed me that I would need a mastectomy. It is my right breast that is diseased; the left breast has never shown signs of cancer. They gave me the option to remove both breasts or just the diseased breast. I chose to remove only the right breast and to preserve my healthy left breast. Why? Because there was no sign of disease in my left breast and I tested negative for the gene that pre-disposes one to breast cancer.

Besides, the surgeons warned me that having a mastectomy isn’t the insurance policy that we all hope it is.

The surgeons cannot guarantee that they can remove 100% of the breast tissue, so with even one breast cell left behind post-mastectomy, cancer can grow, which is exactly what happened to me.

I underwent the mastectomy and reconstruction, a process that was extremely complicated and painful since I had already received radiation on that right breast. Radiation degrades the tissues and makes reconstruction more complex. My plastic surgeon had to swing my latissimus muscle from my back to my chest wall in order to support an implant; he also had to harvest tissue from my back to reconstruct a nipple. He then tattooed the reconstructed nipple to match my natural nipple. He did an amazing job and I sit an awe of the results of a good plastic surgeon. When I showed a girlfriend the results of my surgeries, she asked which one was fake? That is how good reconstruction can be.

Perugia Italy January 2012

A year later the cancer returned for a third time in the same right breast. The cancer came back in a more aggressive form, an invasive form. Two rapidly growing tumors each a different type of cancer.  I would require immediate surgery, chemotherapy, 35 radiation treatments, and even more reconstructive surgeries. I was devastated as my breast continued to try to kill me even though it was gone.